Hennesy Hammock Review

This is just a quick review for an Expedition Asym Classic Hennesy Hammock. I have had this hammock for about four years now. First off, if you want one, this is the time of year to order one. They are generally on sale and giving extras away as well. When I ordered mine I got a free set of snake skins, which come in very handy and free shipping. I also ordered the larger rain fly. I use the smaller rain fly with an ENO Nest Hammock for my son. I wanted the larger rain fly so that gear I left on the ground under the hammock wouldn’t get wet. Mostly just my shoes, I usually clip my bag onto the ridge line.

I love this hammock. It is much easier to get into than standard hammocks and the Velcro entrance closes right up once you are inside. It is so much more comfortable than laying on the ground and it is fairly quick to setup. It will take you a few times setting it up before you’ll have the process down. The other nice advantage to a hammock over a tent is that if it is pouring out, chances are you’ll stay drier in the hammock than you will in a tent.

Another good quality about this hammock is that the mosquito netting is sewn on, so there are no holes for the blood suckers to get through. There is also a nice pouch hanging from the ridge on the inside of the hammock which is great for flashlights, glasses and other small things you may need quickly or want within reach.

My hammock has held up well and I haven’t really had any problems with it at all. The only downside to this setup is that it is still heavier than the setup I use for my son which I also use when I want to backpack as light as possible. The Hennesy hammock is still lighter than most tents and a whole lot more comfortable and easier to pack. It also has the mosquito netting for bug protection. Here are the specs for the hammock I bought as well as the information from Hennesy hammocks website:

 

Classic bottom entry with velcro closure.

This is our most popular model with all our patented features including mesh pocket on ridgeline and webbing straps to protect the bark of trees.  New asymmetrical shape and 30% larger rainfly than the Scout model.  New 70D catenary cut rainfly to reduce weight and wrinkles.  This is an all-purpose hammock – great for backpacking, family camping, expeditions, kayaking, motorcycling, and any other purpose which requires comfort and durability at an affordable price.

Specifications

Height limit: 6′ tall / 180 cm

Weight limit: 250 lbs / 115 kg

Packed Weight: 2 lbs 9 oz / 1160 g

Packed Size: 4″ x 7″ x 9″

Hammock fabric: 210D Oxford nylon

Hammock dimensions: 100″ x 52″‘ (diagonal)

Mesh: 30D polyester No-See-Um netting

Suspending ropes: 10′ long 1600 lb. test polyester rope

Webbing straps: 1.5″ x 42″ long black polyester

Rainfly weight: 10 oz / 280 g

Rainfly fabric: 70D polyurethane coated polyester ripstop

Rainfly dimensions: Parallelogram 63″ X 99″ / 160cm X 252cm Diagonal length above ridgeline 132″ / 335cm

Color: Hunter green hammock with hunter green fly and black trim

Stuff Sack: Logo and set up instructions printed on ripstop polyester bag (18 g., 5/8 oz.)

What’s Included: All Hennessy Hammocks come complete with attached mosquito netting, detachable rain fly, support ropes, and stuff sack with set up instructions on back. Hennessy Hammock also provides complimentary standard 42″ long “Tree Hugger” webbing straps to protect the bark of trees. Because these accessory webbing straps are complimentary, they are weighed separately from the hammock.

 

If you would like to just buy a complete hammock setup, then I highly recommend Hennesy Hammocks. You can’t go wrong.  They do have lighter weight packages but I didn’t want to spend the extra money. Have you ever used a Hennesy Hammock or any hammock for backpacking or camping? If you have used Hennesy Hammocks, have you had any problems with your setup? I hope this review was helpful. If you have never tried using a hammock for camping or backpacking I recommend you try it. You may never use a tent again.

A simple shelter

The fallen tree or debris shelter is one of the simplest survival shelters to make. If you find yourself stuck out in the wilderness with no man made form of shelter like a tarp or tent and there are no other natural forms of shelter, then knowing how to build this shelter could be very helpful and lifesaving.

First survey your surroundings. You can either use a fallen tree where the tree is still attached, about 3-4 feet off the ground, to the trunk. It should look like a triangle on its side. If you do use the fallen tree method, make sure the tree is secure and you are not in danger of the tree coming loose and crushing you. The method I recommend and use is first find a generally good level spot where you would like to make camp. Next, look for a good sturdy tree with some good branches that will be low enough for the entrance of your shelter. Now go find a log for the ridge of your shelter. Make sure it is long enough so that you will be able to lie down in the shelter when you are done building. I am 6 feet tall so I generally try to find a thick log or fallen tree that is about 9-10 feet long. If you cannot find a good log or already fallen tree then you will have to cut a small tree to fit your needs. Try to find everything you use on your shelter from already fallen trees if at all possible.

Now lean the log on the tree so that one end of the log is still on the ground and the other is resting on top of a thick branch where it ties into the main part of the tree. Lay the log in the notch of the branch and trunk. If you have some sort of cordage it wouldn’t hurt to tie the log off for safety sake. You will now want to go find sticks or branches that are about as thick as your forearm and lean those out along the log you have leaning against the tree. Make sure you have a good steep angle to help run water off in case of rain. If you weave some thinner branches or vines trough the branches it will help make it sturdy.

If you are in an area with evergreen trees you can begin thatching the roof with evergreen branches. Keep the butt end of the branch up and start along the ground and keep piling them on until you reach the ridge log. Place a layer of evergreen branches along the ridge so that they overlap each sidewall and close the ridge up.  Now just fill the inside with leaves or evergreen branches and move in for the night. You can also close in the front door with branches and leaves after you are inside. Make sure that you do have some vitalization though.

If you are not in an area with evergreens then you can supplement by building up piles of leaves and debris against the walls you built out of sticks.  Place some small branches on top of the leaves and debris to help hold everything together and then place more leaves and debris on top of those branches. Completely cover the two walls and ridge. The more layers of leaves and debris that you have the warmer the shelter will be and you will be less likely to get wet in a rain storm. Place a thick layer of leaves inside the shelter for bedding. Climb in and enjoy all your work.

In the winter you can also place snow on the outside walls and ridge for insulation and to cut out any wind that might be blowing. I recommend that you test out building one of these shelters in your own yard or wherever you might be able to. It is easier to learn from any mistakes you make now than when your life might depend on it. There are also many modifications that you can make to this shelter as well. You can thatch the walls with birch bark, add a tarp or Tyvek underneath the thatching to make the shelter more water resistant and you can also thatch the roof with moss. Have you ever built one of these shelters and what modifications if any did you use? As always build at your own risk and never stop learning and fine tuning your survival skills. You are only guaranteed to have your knowledge and skills in a true survival situation. You may not have any man made tools or supplies when you most need them. So go out and enjoy the wonderful place we call the great outdoors and test your survival skills.