Quick Tip #13

When putting together an emergency fishing kit try using braided fishing line instead of mono. If you’ve ever tried to straighten out that emergency fishing line in any of the small kits available on the market today you know it’s a feat in itself to get it untangled and to try to ever get it straight again. Braided fishing line can take being wound up tightly unlike mono line can. Also the braided line is thinner in comparison to the mono for the same pound test line. If you ever need that emergency fishing kit you made you’ll be happy (jumping for joy) that you chose to use braided fishing line over mono. Which fishing line do you prefer, braided or mono, for an emergency fishing kit and why?

Quick Tip #12

Take along a folded up piece of Tyvek when you go camping, backpacking or bushcrafting. You can make it any size you want depending on your needs. Tyvek is very lightweight but very useful. When camping or backpacking with a hammock it’s nice to have a small piece of Tyvek to set your bag and shoes on when you’re sleeping at night or to lay things on well you’re setting up your shelter.  Depending on the size of the piece you take it could be used for many things, it could be used to cover firewood to keep it dry, ground cloth, make shift rain fly, food prep surface, make shift umbrella to keep rain or intense sun off, extra layer over or under your sleeping bag for added warmth, food storage bag, makeshift day bag, makeshift poncho or any other useful ways you can come up with to use it. What ways can you come up with to use a piece of Tyvek (size you would be using as well) for camping, backpacking or bushcrafting?

Quick Tip #11

Having trouble keeping moisture from affecting your ammo? Or maybe you would just like to keep your ammo dry for long-term storage. If you have access to a vacuum sealer you’re in luck. First you need to figure out how many shotgun shells or bullets you want to place in each sealed bag. Next seal one end of your bag. Now place what ever amount of ammo that you decided on, in the bag as well as a copy of the front of the box the ammo came out of so that you will know what is in each sealed bag. Now vacuum seal the open end of the bag. Lastly write the date of purchase or the date that you vacuum sealed the ammo on the bag. You can know rest assure that your ammo will stay “fresh” and you’ll have them separated out into useable amounts. This also helps keep spare ammo dry in the field.

 

*Be careful to keep the ammo away from any hot part of the vacuum sealer being used. Try this at your own risk.

Quick Tip #10

Use hydration bags for kids to carry water and food. It will free up their hands for other things like picking berries and exploring. It will also get them use to carrying a bag on their back and slowly introduce them to backpacking over time. I found that with my own kids, they got tired of carrying a water container and the containers were too heavy to clip to their pants. I bought cheap hydration bags from Sam’s Club at the end of the season. I think I ended up only paying $15 per bag. I threw out the plastic bladder bag because it was a cheap plastic and I couldn’t remove the plastic taste and some of them leaked. I prefer to use Stainless bottles anyway. We just place the bottle in the area where the hydration bag would go and place snacks or any other items in the other pouches. There is also a nice little pouch inside of these bags where I place an emergency blanket for each child. That way if something happened where all or any of us got lost and had to spend the night in the wilderness unexpectedly, we would each have some shelter from wind, rain and cold. I like these bags better than other more expensive bags because there is more storage than a standard hydration backpack and they were a lot cheaper. They are a cross between a small hydration pack and a small backpack, perfect for our purposes. Someday I plan on doing a lightweight backpacking trip using one of these packs just to see how well it would work. I’ll let you know how it works out. Have a great time enjoying the wilderness with your kids.

Quick Tip #9

Electrical conduit also called EMT is great for so much more than just running electrical wiring. I use it for simple cheap fence posts. With a 3’x200’ roll of chicken wire and 14, 10’ lengths of EMT you can make a decent size fenced in area for chickens and it won’t cost very much at all. I cut the EMT in half so that I end up with 5’ poles. Using a sledge hammer I pound the poles about 2’ into the ground and I place a pole every 8’. They pound in pretty easily since they are hollow. I add a self tapping screw at the top and bottom of each post to keep the fence in place and then add two zip ties to each post. This makes for a cheap and easy make shift fence. It’s easy to tear down and move to another area and the EMT doesn’t leave big holes in the ground or rust. You can also make simple tracking poles out of EMT and you can store simple survival items inside the poles. I find myself using EMT for a lot of different purposes around my home. It is a very versatile product that can be used for so much more than its intended purpose. What products do you use for things other than their intended purpose?

Quick Tip #8

If you are learning how to make snares or already know how, this tip is for you. Add a pack of guitar strings to your Emergency/Bug Out Bag. They are perfect for making snares. Guitar strings are very strong and vary in thickness so they can be used to make snares for a range of different animals. Guitar strings will also keep a nice round shape which is perfect for making snares.
If you don’t already know how to make a snare I highly recommend that you learn. This way if you find yourself in a survival situation you’ll have another food catching skill. So go out and get yourself a pack of guitar strings and practice making snares, and well your at it throw a pack of strings in your emergency bag. Remember to follow all local hunting laws and practice everything at your own risk. Do you know how to hunt with snares? Have you ever caught anything in a snare?

Quick Tip #7

If you find yourself in a survival situation and need to filter water but you don’t have a commercially made filter you can make one. One way that you can make a simple filter is to use a sock filled with some charcoal from the fire (cold not hot), sand and pebbles. You first place a 1-2″ layer of crushed up coals in the bottom of the sock. Then you add a 1-2″ layer of sand on top of the charcoal. Lastly you put a 1-2″ layer of pebbles or small stones on top of the sand. Now continue to keep layering these same materials in the same order until the sock is full and pebbles are the top layer.
All you do is hang the sock up if you can and carefully pour water into the top center of the sock. Make sure that you have a collection container underneath the bottom of the sock to collect the filtered water as it pours out. This is just a simple way to make a filter with materials you will most likely have in a survival situation. You can also use a plastic bag to house the filter materials but you will have to poke some small holes in the bottom of the bag to allow filtered water to drain out of the bag. Have fun making your own water filters at home and testing them out so that if you are ever in a survival situation you’ll know what works best and how to make one. As always all survival skills need to be practiced. Have you ever made a homemade water filter? How did it work?

Quick Tip #6

Carry some moonshine, everclear or any grain alcohol that is 80 proof or higher, in your emergency bag, bug out bag or in any pack you may use for the outdoors. You can use the alcohol to start a fire by soaking some tinder in it. This will also help if you are dealing with wet tinder. You can use the alcohol as the base for many herbal remedies. If you lack any other type of antiseptic, you can pour or dab some of the alcohol onto the wound. You can use the alcohol as a mouth wash as well. In a survival situation it is not recommended to drink the alcohol because it is only going to dehydrate you (but hay that’s up to you). You can also soak some rags in the alcohol and wrap them around sticks to make torches to be used at night for light or personal protection. There are many survival uses for high proof alcohol which is what makes it a great survival tool to add to anyone’s kit, as long as they are over 21.

Quick Tip

Here is a simple and easy fire starting kit that you can put together yourself. Get a lighter that is full of fluid. Next get 1-3 quick tinders or something similar like the zippo wax coated tinders. Now get a 1 1/2″ ranger band (bicycle tire inner tube cut into different size rubber bands). Wrap the ranger band around the lighter. Now just stuff the tinders under the ranger bands. You now have a simple, lightweight fire starting kit. If you use quick tinders, each one will burn for about two minutes. Also if you make this kit using a zippo lighter, the kit will be easier to use in high winds. If you make this simple modification to every lighter you own, you’ll never be stuck without a way to start a fire as long as you always carry one kit in your pocket. These kits are perfect for emergency/bug out bags.

Quick Tip #5

Here is a simple check list to get you started building an Emergency Bag/Bug Out Bag

  • A good quality bag like a Rothco medium transport
  • 72 hours worth of food or more
  • A couple of bottles of water
  • A water filter or purifier of some sort (Aquamira Filter Bottle)
  • A simple cook stove and cook pot
  • A good quality Full Tang Knife
  • Multi Tool
  • A simple survival kit (contains fire starters, fishing kit, signaling device, emergency blanket etc)
  • Basic First Aid Kit (add medications)
  • A Simple Shelter (Lightweight Tarp and Tyvek ground cloth)
  • Lightweight Sleeping Bag
  • Headlamp (batteries)
  • Backup Flashlight (batteries)
  • Two way Radio (batteries)
  • Dust Mask
  • Work Gloves
  • Hard Candy
  • Some Instant Coffee or Tea Bags
  • Toiletry Bag (Small Shovel and Toilet Paper in Diddy Bag)
  • Zippo Lighter
  • Emergency Rain Poncho
  • 100’ of 550 Para Cord
  • Roll of Duct Tape
  • Small Weather Radio
  • Bandana
  • Ziploc Bag with a copy of all important documents
  • Walking Stick
  • Deck of Cards
  • A Local Map
  • Extra pair of socks
  • A small note pad and pencil

Optional

  • Hunting implements (snares, rat trap, slingshot, guns etc.)
  • Things for personal protection
  • Extra Food